Dog Fear Aggression Journal 7/13/2015

13 Jul

Adorable, Cute, and Fear Aggressive








I continue to journal about Whiskey, our sweet Border Collie.  He is now 2.5 years old, wow, how the time flies!  We continue to treat him for his fear aggression and although it is a lot of work and CONSUMES a lot of our life, it is rewarding.  He is such a sweet boy and his family loves him dearly and he loves us so much as well.  He continues to take 2 Trazadone in morning along with 30 mg of Prozac and then 1-2 Trazadone at night (each Trazadone is 100 mg.).   He is an energetic, smart, loving dog with a typical quirky border collie personality.  If you have ever had a BC before, you understand how intelligent they are and how different than most dogs.  He acts more like a 5 year old child than a dog and we hold conversations with him because the number of words in the English language he understands is CRAZY!  He “talks” back with different types of barks, sounds, and body language.  We usually know what each other is saying without too much trouble.  It really is a different experience to connect with a dog at such an intellectual level. As I have said before in my posts, building the trust with your fear aggressive dog is vital.  Now that we have it so strongly, I worry so much about bringing in new trainers to help us “get to the next level.”  So many dog trainers have so many different philosophies about dog training.  Some are the “Pack Leader Type,” some feel you need to “Break your dog down first,” – when I heard this I cringed!  This type of leadership is the WORST thing for MY DOG.  For dogs with dominant personalities who need to be brought under control, it might be the perfect fit (I personally have never met a dominant dog) but for a fear aggressive dog who lacks self confidence and is very fearful, if you were to BREAK IT DOWN, you would undo EVERYTHING I just worked for in the last two years.  So, I have to be careful that no trainer I work with has or will use this approach with my dog!  He knows I am the pack leader, this no longer needs to be established so I don’t need a pack leader type trainer either.

What he needs is consistent exposure to what he fears with someone who is confident, not afraid, knows when to back off, and can provide him many opportunities to see that what scares him is not a threat.  As he continues to get this feedback to his brain, he will begin to relax and the scary item can get closer and closer but never should it be pushed on him to the point that he is shaking, fearful, or loses the trust in me that I keep him safe.  Finding trainers who will do this is next to impossible but I keep looking!!!  I have some more calls to make.  Most trainers only know how to “train” and most behaviorists only seem to take you so far and then don’t seem to follow through to the end.  I need someone who will listen to BOTH me and my dog, not someone who says, they know better. At this point and more than two years of training, classes, therapy, and living with my dog, I know what he needs and what has worked.  We have come so far and I want us to make it further!!

Whiskey needs to spend time with more company in the house that he doesn’t know.  We had our first guest, A, for 5 days and 4 nights.  Since A is a child (pre-teen), we could not ask of her what we might be able to ask of an adult – no touch, no look, no eye contact (one thing from Caesar that is very important to Whiskey’s comfort with strangers).  A loves dogs and she is a child and he is more nervous with the unpredictability of children.  So, we had to keep him behind a gate, on leash, playing ball (ball will distract him from anything), or in a downstay by our feet.  His reactions were very small over all compared to former visitors, again, showing improvement.  He would do small growls when she would show up at first after we had been gone or first thing in the morning.   I felt that I could probably have let him loose but safety is a priority, so I did not.  The last day, he was begging for food from a downstay and she came and gave him a cracker.  She and he both got up and he went to her.  He really just wanted to sniff her and I could tell by his body language that he was not aggressively going near her, so I asked her to stand still, he went and sniffed her and then backed away because she moved and it scared him, he let out a low growl to say, “hey I am scared,” and I went and put him behind the gate so he could feel safe with distance.  He did the right thing though, when she moved, he backed away.   This is the point, I felt we were at – where he is still quite nervous but he is learning to move away now.  I probably should have rewarded him at the time but I didn’t know if he would know if I was rewarding for the moving away or the growl and I didn’t want to risk that he wouldn’t know that it was the move away that was the correct behavior.

I think that slowly we can begin to do a little bit more, I am VERY conservative and only do things that I fully trust I can tell where Whiskey’s head is at by his body language and energy – although he does need to start going to people on his own and sniffing them and realize that nothing bad happens AND that if at anytime he feels unsure, he can leave.  I wish I could repeat this drill a 100 times, I just need some strangers who don’t fear dogs!!!

I keep hoping to have more time but the time is flying by with all this other work I find myself busy with!!

Will update more later!




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